Blush Crush: A Dusty Rose Georgian in Kingston, MA

Pink houses are a thing, and sorry millennials, you did not start this trend. People have been decorating with pink paints since the 18th century, using red ochre and burnt sienna to create varying shades of the delicate yet earthy color. Pink is in good standing as an historical paint color (Benjamin Moore has several pinks included in their historical palette), but here in New England it's not a hue that's wildly popular, especially in comparison to other perky colors such as yellow and blue. And for some reason, a lot of people recoil at the phrase "pink house," their minds automatically jumping to images of Barbie or Pepto Bismol. Why on earth would your mind go to the worst example possible?! That's the equivalent of hearing the word "landscaping" and automatically picturing an overgrown yard full of shapeless hedges and weeds.

There are many shades of pink, and many great ones, at that. That's why I wanted to share this Georgian style house that's currently for sale in Kingston, MA. The color of the clapboards caught my eye, and then I started flipping through the photos of the interior. Let me be the first to say that there are a lot of reasons to be tickled pink (ha—get it?) about this house.

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The tone-on-tone treatment of the clapboards and shutters increases the impact of the rosy pink hue on this house. Even the trim is painted the deep maroon color. The dark blue door and cream-colored pediment create some contrast, if not a subtle patriotic look.

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In the foyer, the elaborately carved newel post and spindles on the staircase are a show-stopping feature. 

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Notice the wide plank floors and the bull's eye glass in the front door.

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The carved spindles continue all the way up to the second floor where they've been painted white. One of the many fireplaces can be spied in the room to the left, where Delft tile has been laid over the surround and then framed. 

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There are numerous fireplaces in the house, and many of the surrounds have been decorated with Delft tile. 

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The Delft tile surround here really pops against the white walls and woodwork. 

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In addition to the special tile, this room also features two deep window seats.

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The sunroom is one of my favorite spaces in the house. The clouds on the ceiling are an unexpectedly whimsical touch, and I love the dark color on the walls. It feels both cozy and bright at the same time. 

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The three-bay garage has a lovely set of arched doors. 

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A gravel path leads to a barn that's set apart from the main house and garage a little bit. The combination of the weathered shingles with the dusty rose doors and light-colored trim is one of my favorites. Naturally weathered shingles look right at home in a farm-like setting and by the sea—they have such versatility and add immediate character to any structure. 

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The transom window over the main door stretches from end to end—such a pretty detail that also serves the function of allowing some extra light to filter into the barn. 

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This house was built in 1760, so the current paint color is in keeping with late 18th century Georgian architecture. I keep trying to picture it painted yellow or blue or even white, but a rose by any other name...

All photos shown here were taken from the listing. To learn more about this house, visit the listing here